One-quarter of Utah’s autistic children don’t speak

“One in 54 Utah kids has autism — the second highest prevalence in the nation — and 1 in 4 cannot or will not speak,” Salt Lake City’s Deseret News reported Sunday, in an article that focused on the difficulties of living with autism, and the need for more resources to help autistic children and their families. DSC02776-B

The article, “School for kids with autism helps inside and outside the classroom” by Wendy Leonard, a reporter who covers health issues, did not discuss vaccines as a possible cause of autism, but points she touched on in her objectively written article are relevant in the debate over autism.

Many dismiss reports that the number of autistic children is climbing, arguing instead that the numbers only appears to be rising because we are better at detecting autistic children today than we were in the past, and because we today label as autistic children that in the past might have just been seen as poorly socialized, or just odd. Leonard’s 25% figure for autistic children could provide an additional challenge to those making such arguments: Deciding whether a child is merely odd would often be a subjective exercise, open to dispute. Deciding whether a child is non-verbal would generally be clear-cut.

Comments

  1. Laraine Abbey says:

    Many dismiss reports that the number of autistic children is climbing, arguing instead that the numbers only appears to be rising because we are better at detecting autistic children.
    This is beyond absurd going from one in 10,000 to one in less than 50 in 20 years. These are profoundly disturbed kids most of whom could be diagnosed has severely disturbed by virtually anyone. This clearly has nothing to do with better diagnosis! Larry it would be great if you could source the origin of that crazy claim and the fools who pretend to believe it. If the general populace are actually buying into that claim, then America is even more dumbed down than I thought.

    Like

Trackbacks

  1. […] One-quarter of Utah’s autistic children don’t speak. […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s